Tax Questions
 

Joint Estimated Taxes

 

Sometimes a taxpayer and his or her spouse can pay joint estimated taxes instead of making separate estimated tax payments. Below are the rules for making joint estimated tax payments.

 
Who can make joint estimated taxes?

All married taxpayers can make joint estimated tax payments unless:

  • you and your spouse are legally divorced or separated under a divorce decree or separate maintenance

  • you and your spouse have different tax years

  • either spouse is a nonresident alien and has not chosen to be treated as a resident alien for tax purposes. (note that even if you are a nonresident alien, you can choose to be treated as a resident alien for the IRS tax purposes only - this has nothing to do with immigration or the homeland security department)

 

Can I make joint estimated taxes with my spouse even if we are not living together?

Yes, if you qualify for making joint estimated taxes according to the IRS' rules above.

 

What if I am not qualified to make joint estimated tax payments?

Then you have to follow the IRS rules for making separate estimated tax payments.

 

Does my tax filing status for estimated tax payments have to be the same as my tax filing status for federal (or state) tax return?

No. You can file married filing jointly federal and state tax return and yet not qualify for filing joint estimated tax payments.